For years, copyright owners have faced uncertainty as to when they could file a copyright infringement claim. Title 17 U.S.C. § 411(a) states that “no civil action for infringement of the copyright in any United States work shall be instituted until … registration of the copyright claim has been made in accordance with this title.”

The U.S. Copyright Act permits, but does not require, registration of copyright-protected works with the U.S. Copyright Office.  Nevertheless, under the U.S. Copyright Act, registration by the Copyright Office (or ruling by the Copyright Office refusing to register) is, among other things, a prerequisite to bringing a copyright infringement action.  The federal courts have long

One of the overlooked issues of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union is the implications of “Brexit” on the rights afforded to individuals and entities holding European Union trademark and design registrations (a/k/a “EU Community Registrations”).  The EU Community Registration process has become favored by many trademark owners across the globe for a number

On July 15, 2015, we discussed the decision of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia in Pro-Football, Inc. v. Amanda Blackhorse, et al.  In Pro-Football, the District Court affirmed a decision by the United States Patent and Trademark Office directing the cancellation of six “REDSKINS” trademark registrations owned by the

If I want to start using a trademark similar to someone else’s, does it matter whether other people are using similar marks? Last week, in Jack Wolfskin Ausrustung Fur Draussen Gmbh & Company KGAA v. New Millennium Sports, S.L.U., the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit said “yes.”

In Jack Wolfskin, Jack